Jonathan Winter

Dartmouth Research Adds Detail to the Climate Picture

Anyone who travels on the highways of Northern New England is well aware of how much temperature and precipitation can vary from hilltop to valley. Now a Dartmouth-led research team has scaled down global climate models to create a sharper picture of this kind of local climate. . . (read more)

Impacts of Climate Change on Lake Champlain Basin

This summer Jonathan Winter received additional funding to support his research assessing the impacts of climate change on the Lake Champlain Basin.  This work is part of a broader NSF project led by the University of Vermont to create policy-relevant information on land use and management strategies to reduce algal blooms in Lake Champlain, which are caused by nutrient pollution and are toxic to humans, now and in the future.  

Studying Places Where Climate Change and Society Overlap

When a farmer and a climate scientist talk about the weather, they’re not just passing time—it’s serious business.

Climate change, including shifts in average temperature and precipitation as well as the probability of extreme events such as drought, floods, and heat waves, are not abstract political questions to the farmer; they are matters of economic life and death.

This is a reality climate scientist Jonathan Winter knows well. He did his post-doctoral work in hydroclimatology at the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies and Columbia University with agronomist Cynthia Rosenzweig, a pioneer in the study of climate change and agriculture. The Department of Geography hired Winter this month as an assistant professor.

“We’re thrilled that Jonathan Winter will be joining the geography department,” says department chair Susanne Freidberg. “Besides working at the cutting edge of one of the key areas of climate change modeling, he’ll be teaching courses related to agriculture, which are in high demand at Dartmouth.”