News & Events

  • Today more than half the world’s population lives in cities, and projections suggest that almost all population growth in the next thirty years will occur in cities.  Both today and historically, cities occupy a key position in our symbolic imaginations and lived experience.  Seats of political power, cities are also crucibles for cultural and social change.  They are simultaneously centers of economic development, cultural energy, civic, intellectual and artistic achievement, and ...

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  • Simone Wien ’16, a Geography modified with Economics major, was selected to present at the Annual Engaged Scholarship & Social Justice Undergraduate Research Conference at Harvard College, and was awarded First Prize for Best Undergraduate Poster Presentation.

    Simone’s research project “After Brown: Desegregation, Schooling, and Property Values in New Rochelle, NY” examined the relationship between changes in property values and public school demographics within the New...

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  • In November and December 2015, Abigail Neely, assistant professor of Geography and Arun Ponshumnugam ’17 spent three weeks in South Africa conducting an in-depth survey and gathering GPS data about health care access in rural South Africa.  Dr. Neely has been working in the Pholela region of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa for close to a decade, but it was Arun’s first trip.  This research was funded by the Mellon Foundation through the Leslie Center for the Humanities and by the John Sloan...

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  • Anyone who travels on the highways of Northern New England is well aware of how much temperature and precipitation can vary from hilltop to valley. Now a Dartmouth-led research team has scaled down global climate models to create a sharper picture of this kind of local climate. . . (read more)

  • It’s now common to refer to health plan members and patients alike as “health care consumers,” and to talk about the trend toward consumerism in U.S. health care. But what does that really mean — and is this mindset a good one to embrace? - See more at: https://blog.highmark.com/our-nations-health-care-system-a-conversation-with-abigail-neely/#sthash.SzYVx4XK.dpuf

  • At the occasion of the end of the research program Reppaval (lien vers présentation), an international workshop was organized at the University of Poitiers (4-5 December 2015) in order to discuss social, cultural and political issues of dam and weir removal operations in Europe (Spain, Sweden, France) and North America (Canada, USA). Dam (and weir) removal projects, which are the most widespread river restoration operation in north-western France, are in fact also the most conflicting due to...

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  • Christopher Sneedon book, Concrete Revolution: Large Dams, Cold War Geopolitics, and US Bureau of Reclamation, has been selected as the winner of the 2016 Meridian Book Award. This annual award recognizes a book that makes an unusually important contribution to advancing the science and art of geography. In this stellar history, geographer Christopher Sneddon traces the twentieth-century boom that saw 50,000 big dams built worldwide. The US Bureau of Reclamation...

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  • Treva Ellison is an inter-disciplinary scholar whose research focuses on criminalization, carceral geographies, and social movements in the United States with an emphasis on gender and sexuality. Treva’s writing appears in places such as Transgender Studies Quarterly, Feminist Wire, and Scholar and Feminist Online. Treva is currently working on their manuscript project, Towards a Politics of Perfect Disorder: Carceral Geographies, Queer Criminality, and Other Ways to...

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  • This summer Jonathan Winter received additional funding to support his research assessing the impacts of climate change on the Lake Champlain Basin.  This work is part of a broader NSF project led by the University of Vermont to create policy-relevant information on land use and management strategies to reduce algal blooms in Lake Champlain, which are caused by nutrient pollution and are toxic to humans, now and in the future.  

  • Professor of Geography Frank Magilligan and his colleagues are studying the way rivers respond when dams are removed. "Dam removals help us understand how rivers behave," he tells NOVA Next. Read more at http://dartgo.org/ar/rr/dnowmagilligan1.

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