Faculty Research

Understanding Health Care Access in Rural South Africa

In November and December 2015, Abigail Neely, assistant professor of Geography and Arun Ponshumnugam ’17 spent three weeks in South Africa conducting an in-depth survey and gathering GPS data about health care access in rural South Africa.  Dr. Neely has been working in the Pholela region of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa for close to a decade, but it was Arun’s first trip.  This research was funded by the Mellon Foundation through the Leslie Center for the Humanities and by the John Sloan Dickey Center for International Understanding, both at Dartmouth.  Below are some thoughts and reflections of Arun’s.

 

Dartmouth Research Adds Detail to the Climate Picture

Anyone who travels on the highways of Northern New England is well aware of how much temperature and precipitation can vary from hilltop to valley. Now a Dartmouth-led research team has scaled down global climate models to create a sharper picture of this kind of local climate. . . (read more)

Our Nation's Health Care System

It’s now common to refer to health plan members and patients alike as “health care consumers,” and to talk about the trend toward consumerism in U.S. health care. But what does that really mean — and is this mindset a good one to embrace? - See more at: https://blog.highmark.com/our-nations-health-care-system-a-conversation-with-abigail-neely/#sthash.SzYVx4XK.dpuf

THE SOCIAL AND POLITICAL CONTEXT OF DAM REMOVALS: THE ROLE OF NATURE, KNOWLEDGE AND PLACE

At the occasion of the end of the research program Reppaval (lien vers présentation), an international workshop was organized at the University of Poitiers (4-5 December 2015) in order to discuss social, cultural and political issues of dam and weir removal operations in Europe (Spain, Sweden, France) and North America (Canada, USA). Dam (and weir) removal projects, which are the most widespread river restoration operation in north-western France, are in fact also the most conflicting due to the fact ecological continuity reestablishment often involves landscape changes and activity transformations … The aim of this international workshop is to compare and share experiences of ecological continuity restoration in different cultural, institutional and political contexts. For more information: http://reppaval.hypotheses.org/1767

New #BlackLivesMatter Class

The school will offer a course this spring titled “10 Weeks, 10+ Professors: #BlackLivesMatter,” examining structural violence against communities of color. The lessons in the pilot course will be split into 15 sections that span more than 10 academic departments, including — but not limited to —  anthropology, history, women’s and gender studies, mathematics and English, according to The Dartmouth.

To read entire article:

http://college.usatoday.com/2015/02/04/dartmouth-to-offer-course-on-blac...

Indigenous Confluence: The Role of Indigenous Peoples in River Stewardship & Sustainable Futures

Coleen Fox (along with Professors Nick Reo and Dale Turner) participated in a research project called 'Indigenous Confluence: The Role of Indigenous Peoples inRiver Stewardship & Sustainable Futures'. The research project brings together representatives from Walpole Island First Nation, Waikato-Tanui (a Maori tribe from New Zealand), and the Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians to investigate the role of traditional ecological knowledge in river restoration.  The projects being carried out by the indigenous communities range from dam removals and pollution abatement to fisheries restoration.  The three communities met in Northern Michigan and Ontario in early September, and they will all travel to New Zealand later this year.

The migration response to the Legal Arizona Workers Act

Richard Wright has a new paper in the journal Political Geography.  Working with Mark Ellis, Matt Townley and Kristi Copeland (U Washington), he is interested in the effects of state level legislation on internal migration in the US.  The effects of Jim Crow laws on the exodus of blacks form the US South are well known and well documented.  Wright and colleagues ask: are the immigrant hostile environments in certain US states producing outflows of targeted populations. They focus on The 2008 Legal Arizona Workers Act (LAWA). LAWA requires all public and private employers to authenticate the legal status of their workers using the federal employment verification system known as E-Verify. With LAWA, Arizona became the first state to have a universal mandate for employment verification. While LAWA targets unauthorized workers, most of whom are Latino immigrants, other groups could experience LAWA's effects, such as those who share households with undocumented workers.

Faculty Spotlight: Jaclyn Hatala Matthes

Jaclyn Hatala Matthes is a new assistant professor in the Department of Geography and an adjunct assistant professor in the Department of Biology.

Professor Matthes works at the intersection of ecosystem ecology and atmospheric science to investigate physical and biological feedbacks between global climate change, land-use change, and ecosystem processes. She is particularly interested in understanding how ecosystems control greenhouse gas fluxes between the biosphere and atmosphere, and the role that ecosystem management plays in the global carbon cycle. Her research also explores the impacts of disturbance processes, such as insect and pathogen outbreaks, floods, land-use changes, and fires, on the carbon cycle of ecosystems.

In Winter 2015, Professor Matthes will teach a new course, GEOG 8: Life in the Anthropocene, which will investigate the physical and ecological consequences of our current era of unprecedented human impacts on the Earth and its ecosystems. Because her research is interdisciplinary, Professor Matthes looks forward to collaborating with a broad range of students with diverse interests.

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