Richard Wright

The migration response to the Legal Arizona Workers Act

Richard Wright has a new paper in the journal Political Geography.  Working with Mark Ellis, Matt Townley and Kristi Copeland (U Washington), he is interested in the effects of state level legislation on internal migration in the US.  The effects of Jim Crow laws on the exodus of blacks form the US South are well known and well documented.  Wright and colleagues ask: are the immigrant hostile environments in certain US states producing outflows of targeted populations. They focus on The 2008 Legal Arizona Workers Act (LAWA). LAWA requires all public and private employers to authenticate the legal status of their workers using the federal employment verification system known as E-Verify. With LAWA, Arizona became the first state to have a universal mandate for employment verification. While LAWA targets unauthorized workers, most of whom are Latino immigrants, other groups could experience LAWA's effects, such as those who share households with undocumented workers.

Celeste Winston ’14: Researching Urban Racial Dynamics

Research, says Celeste Winston ’14, is a freeing form of scholarship. “Undergraduate research has given me the ability to explore my interests with the assistance of Dartmouth faculty and with the inspiration of some of my fellow Dartmouth students.”

In the video below, Winston and Wright talk about undergraduate research in general and Winston’s senior thesis project.

Having come to Dartmouth from Washington, D.C., the geography major set her thesis sights on Atlanta—a city, she says, that is “profoundly shaped by race, particularly whether one is a recent black immigrant or a black American.”

Winston met with representatives of Atlanta’s chapter of the Black Alliance for Just Immigration (BAJI) in August 2013. “My research was shaped by BAJI’s goals of forging alliances between black immigrants and black Americans,” she says. “I hope my research findings ultimately help BAJI advance its mission.”

American Cities Segregate, Even As They Diversify (The Atlantic)

According to new research by Richard Wright, professor of geography and the Orvil E. Dryfoos Professor of Public Affairs, both integrated and segregated neighborhoods exist in cities across America, reports The Atlantic.

Wright and his colleagues used data from the 1990, 2000, and 2010 censuses to create maps representing demographic change in 53 American cities over a 20-year period, The Atlantic explains.  As Wright points out, the research shows that both diversity and segregation exist simultaneously in U.S. cities. “Rather than thinking of segregation and diversity as being on a continuum from segregated to diverse, moving linearly between those two points, our research admits to the possibility of folds in that continuum. You can have segregation and diversity in the same place, at the same time.”

Read the full story, published on 6/25/12 by The Atlantic.

Racial Diversity Increases, But Segregation Persists Says Geography Professor

While census data shows racial diversity is increasing in major cities across the United States, highly diverse neighborhoods are still rare, newly arrived immigrants continue to settle in concentrated residential patterns, and many African Americans remain concentrated in segregated neighborhoods, according to recent research by Richard Wright, professor of geography and the Orvil E. Dryfoos Professor of Public Affairs.

Wright and two colleagues—Steven R. Holloway of the University of Georgia and Mark Ellis of the University of Washington—examined neighborhood tract data from the 1990, 2000, and 2010 U.S. censuses and created “cartographic visualizations” of 53 large metropolitan areas and every state in the United States. Their maps showing the changes in neighborhood racial configuration in these cities can be viewed here.